Welcome!

My name is Noah Wheeler. This is my personal website. I am a student of human behavior who is passionate about learning how to design technology for people. Learn more!

About Me

Picture of Noah WheelerI am in my fourth year as a doctoral student at Texas Tech. The program I am in focuses on human factors research. My goal is to become an expert at designing user experiences. Currently, my skills include:

  • User experience testing and design for desktop and mobile applications.
  • Enhancing user experience with expert reviews for numerous Web applications.
  • User requirements gathering.
  • Ethnographic observations and interviews for mobile design.
  • Over four years experience in Web development in HTML, PHP, and JS.
  • Working with distributed teams around the globe.
  • Experimental design and advanced statistical analyses.

I hope you enjoy my site. For more information about my experience and work, please visit my LinkedIn page.

Education

Texas TechIn May 2009, I graduated from the State University of New York at Fredonia with a B.A. in Psychology and a minor in Computer Information Sciences. I hope to graduate from Texas Tech in 2015 with a Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology with a focus in human factors. I look forward to exploring human performance in the minimally invasive surgical environment.

Interests

Fredonia As a freshman in college, I developed an interest in human factors and user experience. I love researching ways to make products and systems user centered. I worked for a year as a usability analyst and project manager for a social networking development company and fell in love with user experience design. I enjoy conducting task-analyses, user experience testing, prototype development, gathering user requirements, and applying research to real-world problems.

Research

Wheeler, N. J. (2013). Uncovering mental models to inform mobile information architecture: The use of repeated cluster analyses on card sort data. Paper presented at The Houston Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Tenth Annual One-Day Symposium of Human Factors and Ergonomics, Houston, TX.

Wheeler, N. J., & Klein, M. I. (2013). Prior experience in laparoscopic surgery enhances performance in novel conditions. Paper presented at The Houston Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Tenth Annual One-Day Symposium of Human Factors and Ergonomics, Houston, TX.

Wheeler, N. J., McIntyre, T. J., Levulis, S. J., & Hippalgaonkar, K. (2013). Optimizing difficulty: Enhancing game experience using simplified facial coding. Poster presented at The Houston Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Tenth Annual One-Day Symposium of Human Factors and Ergonomics, Houston, TX.

McIntyre, T. J., Jones, K. S., Schmidlin, E. A., & Wheeler N. J. (2013). How do people judge the capabilities of a robot? Paper presented at The Houston Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Tenth Annual One-Day Symposium of Human Factors and Ergonomics, Houston, TX. (Received award for best student paper)

Derby, P. L., Jones, K. S., & Wheeler, N. J. (2013). Self-regulated learning in virtual simulations. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Human Factors & Ergonomics Society, 57, 2121-2121.

Wheeler, N. J., Klein, M. I., & Craig, C. (2012). Camera placement in simulated laparoscopic surgery influences performance. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Human Factors & Ergonomics Society, 56, 1346-1350.

Jones, K. S., Schmidlin, E. A., & Wheeler, N. J. (2012). Can users judge the stair-climbing abilities of two-wheeled selfbalancing robots? Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Human Factors & Ergonomics Society, 56, 1326-1330.

Wheeler, N. J., Klein, M. I., & Craig, C. (2011, September). Stress, movement error and adaptation in laparoscopic surgery. Paper presented at the Texas Association of Surgical Skills Laboratories Annual Meeting, Lubbock, TX. (Received award for best paper)

Wheeler, N. J., & Klein, M. I. (2011, April). Peak movement error and mental workload as a function of camera location in laparoscopic surgery. Paper presented at the Texas Regional Human Factors & Ergonomics Society Symposium, Houston, TX.

Luber, E., Wheeler, N., & Dyck, J. L. (2007, April). The effects of telephone menu structure on accuracy and reaction time. Paper presented at the Western Pennsylvania Undergraduate Psychology Conference, Grove City, PA.

Contact Me

Please contact me for consulting requests, career opportunities, and
other professional communications.

Contact Information

Noah Wheeler
Psychology Building
MS 2051
Texas Tech University
Lubbock, TX 79409

Copyright © Noah Wheeler 2012